Week 6

The Beauty of Horses

EAT, Equine Assisted Therapy, is a treatment that uses equine activities to help people who struggle with autism, trauma, behavioral issues, ADD, depression, and other mental health issues. I have always loved horses. Growing up I felt a strong, unexplainable connection to them, similar to the way I feel about dogs. I didn’t know at the time that they were therapeutic animals, but I felt it. I use to work with special needs kids and I used to take one of them to EAT sessions in Will Rodgers State Park.

In Class Blog

 

Interesting Facts about Horses and Sheep:

Horses:

There are more than 400 different breeds of horses. Horses can weigh as much as 2,200 pounds. I also read that horses apparently have the largest eyes of all animals that live on land. It can take up to around a year to regrow their hooves.

Sheep:

Rabbit, Snake, Dragon (Blog Post #2)

In the last meeting, we discussed the relationship between the rabbit and the moon. The moon does have a weird imprint on it that does look like a rabbit, but we also talked about the Jade Rabbit. The story goes that the jade emperor, an important figure in Chinese mythology, turned himself into a starving old man and begged for food from different animals.

Reflections on the Snake, Dragon, and Rabbit

As an art history major, the scientific aspects that we discussed during our last meeting were very interesting, but also quite obscure and new to me. I found it fascinating that despite all our differences, all humans and animals are much more alike than one may think—given that our bodies are all structured according to the same set of hox genes.

Thoughts on the Rabbit, Dragon, and Snake

I was reading about how the Chinese zodiac animals were sequenced. When the Jade Emperor decided he wanted twelve animals to be his guards, he set up a race to his Heavenly Gate. The order the animals arrived would represent their ranking. It was no surprise to me that the rabbit would be arrogant about his speed and considering the rabbit was making fun of the ox for being slow, the rabbit got his comeuppance for finishing after the ox.

Second Blog Post: Rabbits for Science? What about Dragons and Snakes?

            Moving on to the next three animals on the HOXZODIAC wheel, we begin with the rabbit. In Chinese culture, the rabbit represents the moon, some say because the shadows of the moon resemble a rabbit. Others say it’s because of the rabbit’s pure characteristics. This is not to mention that in Western Culture, the rabbit’s foot is considered lucky. Rabbits are earnest with everything they do; they just ask that others treat them the same way.

The Ethics of Bio-Art & Technology

When skimming through the countless essays that constitute the given reading we were given to select an essay from, one distinctly stood out to me. It started of with the title, “The Ethics of Experiential Engagement with the Manipulation of Life.” Studying biology and years of humane and inhumane research, one really begins to wonder when ethics falls in line to what is right and what is wrong in research. There are many perspectives to this. There is of course the biological perspective of life as well the cultural beliefs we created as a society.

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